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Crimes of morality

27 September, 2009

The ABC reports that the politicians of the Indonesian province of Aceh have been asked to hold off passing a Bill. The Bill as it stands punishes married adulterers to death by stoning and those who are unmarried receive one hundred strokes of the cane.

Husni Bahri Top, the Aceh provincial secretary has said:

“For the time being, we do not agree that stoning people to death should be included in the punishment for married adulterers.”

“There should be an in-depth assessment based on various sources in the Koran, opinions from Islamic preachers and an assessment of the techniques for how to implement it.”

Does that mean the shape and size of the stones, throwing styles or the number of ‘tossers’? Probably not, as the Bill was passed a few days later.

Throughout history, religion has informed morality that in turn has criminalised certain sexual acts. The regulation of sex can be broken down into procreative acts that went against the social, economic and cultural fabric of society and ‘unnatural’ or non-procreative acts. The former could include sexual assault, prostitution, fornication and adultery and the latter adultery, homosexual sex, bestiality and masturbation.

Some acts that take place as a result of ( perhaps unintentional) procreative sex, like abortion, can also be illegal in Queensland. Two people have been committed to stand trial over the archaic laws of procuring an abortion and supplying a drug to procure an abortion. They have already been targeted by vigilantes.

There is less than a month to sign the online petition to let the Legislative Assembly of Queensland know that you disagree that termination of a pregnancy can still be classed as a criminal offence. Abortion should not be an offence against morality as set out in Chapter 22 of the Criminal Code. If you feel you have the right to tell a woman what they can do with their bodies you can sign the other one.

Anna Bligh has said:

“The law in Queensland on this issue can only be changed if there’s a majority on the floor of the parliament that wants it changed and that majority is not there.”

Let’s give Anna that majority so there is no excuse not to change the law. Do you know your local members stance on the issue? Does your local member know your feelings on the issue? Find out and let them know how you feel.

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. 28 September, 2009 8:27 am

    Ileum
    Ethically abortion is NOT just about a woman’s autonomy to decide the fate of her own body. It is about when does a human being have the right to be considered human and therefore entitled to be protected from summary execution.
    The case in question has always sounded like an activists set up because the reality is that it has for a very long time been possible and not that difficult for any woman to get an abortion here in Queensland. But putting that aside what this couple did was try to get around the law here and even if you are a supporter of abortion on demand you should support their prosecution on the basis that they are trying to promote the distribution of prescription drugs by non doctors.
    BTW
    My position on abortion is simply that it should be safe, affordable and accessible but above all rare.

  2. 28 September, 2009 2:39 pm

    It may be simplistic Iain, but that is all it is for me. It is a decision that I’m glad I will not have to make but it is one that should be made by the individual not the government.

    On the difficulty of obtaining an abortion – well they did just amend the law so there must have been some problems
    https://ozpolitik.wordpress.com/2009/09/02/abortion-laws-in-queensland/

    I don’t think they were trying to distribute drugs but anyhow I believe it is up to an individual what they choose to ingest.

    Does your postion mean that you would support the petition?

  3. 1 October, 2009 10:07 am

    Petition duly signed. Thanks for the heads up.

  4. 1 October, 2009 11:43 pm

    thanks for this ileum.

    does distribution of drugs by “non-doctors” as Iain mentions, mean OTC distribution by registered pharmacists?

  5. 1 October, 2009 11:58 pm

    ah, drugs from overseas, I see. The plot thickens. We can’t let those in, or have women procuring abortions.

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